Nat swims

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    • #12501

      I am wondering what the most unexpected and impressive swims of the meet were for guys in the MIAA? A few that come to mind would be….

      Krone’s mile, out faster than his 500, dies and still goes 15:44.
      Ellis’ 200 Back. 1:50.50 for a guy who supposedly struggles over 100 is pretty darn good.
      Nelis’ 100 Fly. 50.2 open and 49.7 on the medley, kid just keeps getting faster
      Dmitruk’s 200 split on the 800 Free Relay. 1:44.0 is certainly noteworthy.
      Vogelzang’s 21.08 leading off Hope’s sprint relay is a nice drop too.

      I thought a little post nationals talk would be good.

    • #37272

      @CommodoreLongfellow wrote:

      I am wondering what the most unexpected and impressive swims of the meet were for guys in the MIAA? A few that come to mind would be….

      Krone’s mile, out faster than his 500, dies and still goes 15:44.
      Ellis’ 200 Back. 1:50.50 for a guy who supposedly struggles over 100 is pretty darn good.
      Nelis’ 100 Fly. 50.2 open and 49.7 on the medley, kid just keeps getting faster
      Dmitruk’s 200 split on the 800 Free Relay. 1:44.0 is certainly noteworthy.
      Vogelzang’s 21.08 leading off Hope’s sprint relay is a nice drop too.

      I thought a little post nationals talk would be good.

      All of your highlights were my highlights too. I would probably add Holton’s 20.6 split to that list. Last year he added an entire second from his MIAA’s performance and this year he showed up huge.

      Probably been said before, but I think MIAA was a lot more impressive this year than last. However, the nation at large was also faster so some of those performances were drowned out. All in all, it’s really refreshing to see some top three performances and some relays that could potentially be there as well next year.

      Ellis is a huge standout to me and he just continues to impress. I was so pissed when I saw they DQed their relay. I think they will get a great sprinter and go a 1:30 next year. Hold on to your hats. Also, it’s really amazing to me that Kzoo placed so highly in individual events but just barely cracked the top 20!? Sounds like the NCAA was team and relay oriented this year. I haven’t looked at the point distribution yet but I can imagine what it looks like.

      Hope needs a 57 breastroker and I’m not saying that can’t be comeone on the current squad.

    • #37273
      N Dynamite
      Member

      I don’t understand why Krone takes his races out the way he does. He goes out in the 500 like it’s a 200 and the 1650 as if it’s a 500. If he would go out a little slower he would finish a lot faster. The first 500 of the 1650 was a perfect example. I agree that the other swims were all impressive, but Krone should be under 4:29 in the 500 and under 15:35 in the mile. He needs to start swimming smarter. He was 2 seconds ahead of Stewart, 3.5 ahead of Bubb, and 4.5 ahead of Newton and Bettencourt at the 200 and was beat by all four. He wins that heat if he doesn’t go out so fast.

    • #37274
      silentp
      Member

      Here’s my top 5 most impressive swims:

      1. Krone’s 1650, new record, sucks he had to get 9th
      2. Ellis 200 back, he is just going to keep improving in this event
      3. Nelis 100 fly, bright future for Nelis
      4. Ellis 100 back, 4th time’s a charm i guess
      5. Dmitruk’s 1:44.0 split, more of a personally impressive swim, especially considering how he started the meet: splitting 21.7 and then 47.9, he must be a better rebounder than dennis rodman… what? not funny? ๐Ÿ™‚

      In all honesty though, there were a lot of swims i was impressive with by several MIAA swimmers, it seemed almost everyone had a good one, so congrats!

    • #37275
      teemohtay
      Member

      @N Dynamite wrote:

      I don’t understand why Krone takes his races out the way he does. He goes out in the 500 like it’s a 200 and the 1650 as if it’s a 500. If he would go out a little slower he would finish a lot faster.

      Does anyone know anything about the Albion coach and their relationship? This is clearly a pattern, and it seems like something that good coaching could easily affect. I can think of several techniques from broken swims in practice to solid race planning to in-race communication of splits, etc. I just wonder if this is something they really work on but then he gets way too jacked up and loses his mind, or if the coach just kind of says, “get out there and swim fast today.”

      That said, I think it is worth noting that I would have loved to “die” and still be in the 4:30 / 15:40 range ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #37276

      Maybe he’s been watching a little too much Pre.

    • #37277
      SwexasTim
      Member

      I was fortunate enough to stand next to keith during krone’s race, he said coming into the national meet they worked on turns constantly (which they were better than miaa’s but still nothing to be proud of) and keith said he continually tells krone to slow down the front of his race and swim smarter but he just doesn’t listen. I got the impression that keith does that he can but isn’t the type of guy to blow down on a swimmer b/c they don’t listen to him. Nothing against keith, but personally I couldn’t handle habitually being not listened too, just me though….

    • #37278
      facenorth
      Member

      Well there is evidence to support Keith based on Paul’s 500 and Mile last weekend. Paul was 4:35 in the 500 and was out in 4:35 for his mile. The difference? 1:44 at the 200 of the 5 and 1:47.7 at the 200 of the mile. Now think of where he could be if he would just throttle back a little bit on the front end. Scary.

    • #37279
      SwexasTim
      Member

      about my earlier comments, i think keith is a great coach, its just unfortunate that krone likes to do his own thing and won’t tone it down up front to have a better time.

      facenorth could you throttle back on the throttle backs…

    • #37280
      99 Red
      Member

      After watching Krone swim the 500 and the 200 in a take it out and die sort of way, I was sitting in the stands watching him go out in the 1650 and thanking God that I never had to swim like him. Life is hard when you swim the 200 fly. Life is harder when you feel like the best way to arrive at your best time is to take the mile out way ahead of record pace and then just try to hold on. Everybody around me flet a healthy mix of respect and pitty for him.

    • #37281

      I suppose there is always the fear that if you don’t take it out, you’ll never be able to get it going? I guess that was a question as much as a statement. It’s all I can figure.

    • #37282
      Low Tide
      Member

      It’s masochistic at best.

    • #37283
      swim5599
      Member

      It is interesting to see that he was 1:47.7 and then 4:35 vs the 1:44 and 4:35. He would have have been under 4:30 at this meet if he just would have taken the front part of that race out in 1:47 plus. He needs to dial it back a notch or 2. I think of Newton who also splits such great races. The race is 500 yards long, which means you have to space your energy out over 500 yards, blasting at the opening 200 is just not that smart.

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