eligibility rules

Forums General General eligibility rules

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #11956
      JHU84
      Member

      Can a person compete if they are going to med school for a university if the have never swam NCAA (just USA swimming)?

    • #30488
      Psimon3
      Member

      You’ll have to check with the schools complinace office, but depending on the age of the swimmer, they should have 2 or 3 years of eligibility.

      And if they can swim and go to med school, my hat is off to them…

    • #30489

      (paraphrasing) A student-athlete has eligibility in the first 10 semesters (or 15 quarters) of full-time enrollment in post-secondary school (college or post-grad). If the student-athlete has eligibility remaining and attends graduate school at the same university where he/she last had eligibility, that student-athlete may compete in one season of competition, only during the FIRST season. This usually means that the S-A has eligibility during the first year of grad/med/law school at the same place that S-A went to college, provided that S-A competed in that particular sport while an undergrad.

      Examples: Jeremy Lankford at The University of Chicago (NCAA Qualifier as a backstroker) swam all four years, but was also on the Track and Field team for 1-2 seasons. He took a year off, attended medical school at Chicago, and had one year (only) of eligibility to participate in T&F (he didn’t use it). Jerome Theraud, also of UC, participated in X-C and track for three seasons each, took 4-5years off, came back to study in a PhD program and had one season left (and used it). Katherine Yang, a swimmer at UC, graduated one year early, has one year left, and if she comes back to study at UC, she has one year of eligibility left, provided she uses that in her first year only in a UC grad program.

      Unless the rule has changed… meaning that Phelps could come back sometime, long after he is no longer a swimming professional, go to grad school somewhere, and swim. The rules (as I understand them) keep this sort of thing from happening.

    • #30490
      DonCheadle
      Member

      I don’t think that there is an age restriction in D3. In 1998 there was a guy who consoled in the 200 breast who was in his 30s. I think the guy was Kevin Crossman from Cortland St but not really sure.

    • #30491
      N Dynamite
      Member

      From what I’ve heard, that’s a d3 and d1 rule. In d2 you don’t have to attend the same school for your grad work.

    • #30492
      lirpa
      Member

      Don,

      Crossman was hs class of ’94, so he was the correct age, even if he looked older.

      The eligibility rules are explained correctly. I know a girl that b/c of AP credits and summer courses graduated in 3 years, she is working on an MBA at the same school and swimming this year. Had she gone elsewhere for the MBA, she could not swim.

      The phelps example is a nice try, but not very applicable. He would have to pay back MILLIONS in swimming earnings. There is also a fairly new rule equating every year of international competition past a certain age to a year of eligibility. This was in response to swimmers at the D-I level like Agnes Kovacs, Attila Czena(sp?), and Zsolt Gasper.

      More likely is a dropout returning to school after a few years in the military or “real word” and giving swimming another go. For some reason, I have seen this a lot with divers.

      YMCA nationals 5 or 6 years back had a 39 year old russian immigrant finaling in the breast events and swimming on relays with his teenage son. B/c of his foreign backround (no US college) he slipped through the elibility cracks. He could have theoretically swum at that meet forever, unless they changed a rule.

      I also think you lose NCAA eligibility if you are a registered member of USMS (masters). Eligibility is a very delicate creature.

    • #30493
      DonCheadle
      Member

      Crossman was a guess, I know it was the 200 breast. There was a guy from UMass Dartmouth, Mike something, maybe that was it?

    • #30494

      The NCAA is concerned with previous college attendance, which I was reminded of with that story of that Russian immigre swimming in a Y meet. Any post-secondary study needs be counted by the NCAA towards the 10 semester/15 quarter rule, no matter where it was undertaken. Someone can’t go to a few years of college in another country and start with a clean slate in the US. See “Iowa Swimming.”

    • #30495
      Chris Knight
      Member

      @lirpa wrote:

      He could have theoretically swum at that meet forever, unless they changed a rule.

      I believe they are now cut off at 21, assuming you don’t swim in college. Scott Weir of Grand Rapids swam an extra year of YMCA in 2002 while attending Indian River, swimming in the bare minimum of Y events. The rumor was that he was trying to get his grades up to get into Clemson. I have no idea what happened to him.

    • #30496
      lirpa
      Member

      I remember Scott Weir. He was 19 at that meet, 2002. I was there, and everytime he accepted an award the swimmers chanted “Go to college.” I never heard from him again either.

    • #30497
      Psimon3
      Member

      @lirpa wrote:

      YMCA nationals 5 or 6 years back had a 39 year old russian immigrant finaling in the breast events and swimming on relays with his teenage son. B/c of his foreign backround (no US college) he slipped through the elibility cracks. He could have theoretically swum at that meet forever, unless they changed a rule.

      He was actually Bulgarian and It was Michael Alexandrov’s (Current IM and Breaststroke Stud at Northwestern) father. The coach at the time, Frank Sampson (formerly of Millikin University) found a loop hole that was sealed up the next year.

    • #30498
      swim5599
      Member

      Frank Sampson now there is a name I have not heard in awhile. Great coach, and I thought that was mildly entertaining to hear about Plamen swimming at that meet. That guy is still fast .

    • #30499
      DonCheadle
      Member

      @lirpa wrote:

      I also think you lose NCAA eligibility if you are a registered member of USMS (masters). Eligibility is a very delicate creature.

      If that is true (about USMS), and if it were true, then a notable college used someone illegally last year.

    • #30500
      Derek
      Member

      @DonCheadle wrote:

      @lirpa wrote:

      I also think you lose NCAA eligibility if you are a registered member of USMS (masters). Eligibility is a very delicate creature.

      If that is true (about USMS), and if it were true, then a notable college used someone illegally last year.

      I don’t believe that is true. As a rule, it makes little sense.

    • #30501
      DonCheadle
      Member

      Just to be clear, what is being suggested about USMS is that a swimmer who has previously been enrolled in college gives up eligibility if they swim USMS?

    • #30502
      lirpa
      Member

      That was something I had heard once. Probably completely wrong. Sorry for any distress or confusion.

Viewing 15 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.